Genealogy: Ancestor photographs are important links to the past

Genealogy: Ancestor photographs are important links to the pastBy Barry J. Ewell

One day, I was looking through a series of photographs of my ancestors taken in the early 1900s. For the first time, I noticed the writing on the window behind the row of carriages. I took out my magnifying glass and looked closer to find the name of the company (Spanish Fork Co-op), date it was established, and related information. I took time to learn more about the co-op and found that my great-great-grandfather was president. That piece of information was just the beginning of the stories and documents that helped me build my knowledge of that generation and their place in my history. Continue reading

Genealogy: Digital Camera Checklist for Research

Digital Camera Checklist for Research By Barry J. Ewell

I use my camera extensively when I conduct field research and through my personal experience built a checklist that I have found important to include with my camera. While I don’t use all of the list each time I am out, I have come prepared to handle most situations that I have that you will encounter.

  1. Digital camera with built-in flash
    1. Two extra sets of rechargeable batteries. Continue reading

Genealogy: Downloading images from digital camera

Downloading images from digital cameraBy Barry J. Ewell

Each time you download pictures from your digital camera, store them in a unique subfolder of the current year. For example, if I’ve been taking pictures at a cemetery, I would create a temporary folder that includes my name, photo shoot, and date (day, month, year) such as “Barry Ewell_Beaver_Cemetery-120407.”  It makes it really easy to find photos when I am ready to sort, delete, name, and file.

Deleting bad images is ok
As the years go by and your collection grows, it will be easier to retrieve photos if you’ve named and sorted them. Continue reading

What every genealogist needs to know about digital content and preservation (100+ resources)

Digitizing contentBy Barry J. Ewell

As a genealogist and/or family historian you are ever increasingly faced with the need to better understand how to create, evaluate, manage, organize, and preserve content that include audio, photography, video, film and more. I’ve learned that even the simplest decision like which format to scan an image can have far reaching irreparable consequences if not done correctly. Continue reading

Genealogy: Photographing people

Genealogy: Photographing peopleFor over 40 years I have used the camera to capture the lives of my family and friends.  The camera has been a very important tool in my professional career in public relations and advertising.  I first started with a film camera and spent hundreds of wonderful/fun hours in a dark room developing and printing my on prints.  Since the late 90’s I have used the digital camera extensively in to aid in my genealogical research.

I would like to share with you a few of the lessons I have learned when photographing people. Continue reading

Genealogy: Photographing children

Genealogy: Photographing childrenBy Barry J. Ewell

For over 40 years I have used the camera to capture the lives of my family and friends.  The camera has been a very important tool in my professional career in public relations and advertising.  I first started with a film camera and spent hundreds of wonderful/fun hours in a dark room developing and printing my on prints.  Since the late 90’s I have used the digital camera extensively in to aid in my genealogical research.

The following are some of the lessons I have learned when photographing children. Continue reading

Genealogy: Where to use your camera for research

Where to use your camera for researcharchBy Barry J. Ewell

The digital camera has been the most flexible and important tool for capturing digital images. As I have sought to learn about my ancestors, I’ve been fortunate to travel to some of the areas where my ancestors lived and have had the opportunity to do on-site research.  These experiences have ranged from half-day excursions to a month long stay.  I used the camera about 90% indoors and 10% outdoors.

Common places indoors

  1. Libraries.
  2. Courthouses.
  3. Museums.
  4. Historical societies.
  5. Homes. Continue reading