Recipe: Gammon Dumplings

Make a plain paste of one pound of flour, (cost four cents,) one dessertspoonful of salt, and one of baking powder, quarter of a pound of finely chopped suet or scraps, (cost two cents,) and sufficient cold water to mix it to a stiff dough; roll this out about half an inch thick, spread over it half a pound of any cheap cut of bacon or ham, finely chopped, (cost six cents,) roll up the dumpling as you would a roly-poly pudding, tie it tightly in a clean cloth, and boil it in boiling water, or boiling pot-liquor, for about three hours. Do not let the pot stop boiling, or the dumpling will be heavy. Serve it hot, with one quart of plain boiled potatoes, (cost three cents.) The dinner will cost fifteen cents.

Twenty-Five Cent Dinners for Families of Six, by Juliet Corson (Year 1879)

Recipe: Crackers

Sift into a pint of flour a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, four tablespoonfuls of melted BUTTER, half a teaspoonful salt and the white of an egg beaten and one cup of milk; mix it with more flour, enough to make a very stiff dough, as stiff as can be rolled out; pounded and kneaded a long time. Roll very thin like pie crust and cut out either round or square. Bake a light brown.

Stale crackers are made crisp and better by placing them in the oven a few moments before they are needed for the table.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Southern Corn Meal or Corn Dodgers

Mix with cold water into a soft dough one quart of southern corn meal, sifted, a teaspoonful of salt, a tablespoonful of BUTTER or lard melted. Mold into oval CAKES with the hands and bake in a very hot oven, in well-greased pans. To be eaten hot. The crust should be brown.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Molasses Corn Cake

Molasses corn cake, just as its name indicates, is corn cake Containing molasses. To those who find the taste of molasses agreeable, this recipe will appeal. Others not so fond of molasses will, without doubt, prefer the plain corn cake. Besides adding flavour, the molasses in this recipe adds food value to the product.

MOLASSES CORN CAKE
(Sufficient for One Medium-Sized Loaf)

  •  1 c. corn meal
  •  3/4 c. flour
  •  3-1/2 tsp. baking powder
  •  1 tsp. salt
  •  3/4 c. milk
  •  1/4 c. molasses
  •  1 egg
  •  2 Tb. melted fat

Mix and sift the corn meal, flour, baking powder, and salt. Add the milk, molasses, and well-beaten egg and stir in the melted fat. Pour into a well-greased loaf pan, and bake in a moderate oven for about 30 minutes.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Southern Corn Cake

In the preceding recipe for corn cake, more flour than corn meal is used, but many persons prefer cake of this kind made with more corn meal than flour. Southern corn cake, which contains more corn meal and less white flour, proves very satisfactory to such persons. Therefore, which of these recipes should be used depends on the taste of those who are to eat the cake.

SOUTHERN CORN CAKE
(Sufficient for One Medium-Sized Loaf)

  •  1 c. corn meal
  •  1/2 c. flour
  •  3 tsp. baking powder
  •  3/4 tsp. salt
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  3/4 c. milk
  •  1 egg
  •  2 Tb. melted fat

Mix and sift together the corn meal, flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Add to them the milk and well-beaten egg, and stir in the melted fat. Pour into a well-greased loaf pan, and bake in a moderate oven for about 30 minutes.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: New England Corn Cake

One quart of milk, one pint of corn meal, one teacupful of wheat flour, a teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of melted BUTTER. Scald the milk and gradually pour it on the meal; when cool add the BUTTER and salt, also a half cup of yeast. Do this at night; in the morning beat thoroughly and add two well-beaten eggs, and a half teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in a spoonful of water. Pour the mixture into BUTTERed deep earthen plates, let it stand fifteen minutes to rise again, then bake from twenty to thirty minutes.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)