Recipe: Boiled Frosting

To one pound of finest pulverized sugar add three wine-glassfuls of clear water. Let it stand until it dissolves; then boil it until it is perfectly clear and threads from the spoon. Beat well the whites of four eggs. Pour the sugar into the dish with the eggs, but do not mix them until the syrup is luke-warm; then beat all well together for one-half hour.

Season to your taste with vanilla, rose-water, or lemon juice. The first coating may be put on the CAKE as soon as it is well mixed. Rub the CAKE with a little flour before you apply the ICING. While the first coat is drying continue to beat the remainder; you will not have to wait long if the CAKE is set in a warm place near the fire. This is said to be a most excellent recipe for ICING.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Cocoa Frosting

  •  4 teaspoonfuls of Baker’s Cocoa,
  •  2 tablespoonfuls of cold water,
  •  3 tablespoonfuls of hot water,
  •  ½ a teaspoonful of vanilla,
  •  About 1 ¾ cups of confectioners’ sugar.

Put the cocoa in a small Saucepan; add the cold water and stir until perfectly smooth; then the hot water, and cook for one or two minutes, add vanilla and a speck of salt, then stir in enough sugar to make it stiff enough to spread nicely. Beat until smooth and glossy and free from lumps.

If too thick, add a little cold water. If not thick enough, add a little sugar. Never make a FROSTING so stiff that it will have to be made smooth with a wet knife. It is better to let it run to the sides of the CAKE. For FROSTING sides of the CAKE, make a little stiffer.
This FROSTING never cracks as an egg FROSTING, but is hard enough to cut nicely.

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made
Candy Recipes, by Miss Parloa (Year 1909)

Recipe: Almond Frosting

The whites of three eggs, beaten up with three cups of fine, white sugar. Blanch a pound of sweet almonds, pound them in a mortar with a little sugar, until a fine paste, then add the whites of eggs, sugar and vanilla extract. Pound a few minutes to thoroughly mix. Cover the CAKE with a very thick coating of this, set in a cool oven to dry, afterwards cover with a plain ICING.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

 

Recipe: Chocolate Frosting

  •  1 square of Baker’s Chocolate,
  •  Pinch of salt,
  •  5 tablespoonfuls of boiling water,
  •  1 teaspoonful of vanilla,
  •  About three cups of sifted confectioners’ sugar.

Melt chocolate in bowl over tea-kettle, add water, salt and vanilla, and when smooth add the sugar, and heat until very glossy. Make the FROSTING stiff enough to spread without using a wet knife. It will keep indefinitely.

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made
Candy Recipes, by Miss Parloa (Year 1909)

Recipe: For Icing Pastry

To ice pastry, which is the usual method adopted for fruit tarts and sweet dishes of pastry, put the white of an egg on a plate and with the blade of a knife beat it to a stiff froth. When the pastry is nearly baked, brush it over with this and sift over some pounded sugar; put it back into the oven to set the glaze and in a few minutes it will be done. Great care should be taken that the paste does not catch or burn in the oven, which is very liable to do after the icing is laid on.

Or make a MERINGUE by adding a tablespoonful of white sugar to the beaten white of one egg. Spread over the top and slightly brown in the oven.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Vanilla Icing

Break the white of one large egg into a bowl, and gradually beat into it one cupful of confectioners’ sugar. Beat for three minutes, add half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract, and spread thinly on the CAKEs.

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made
Candy Recipes, by Miss Parloa (Year 1909)

Recipe: Coffee Icing

  • 2 squares chocolate Confectioners’ sugar
  • ¼ cup boiling water ½ teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate, add boiling water, and mix well; add confectioners’ sugar until of right consistency to spread; add vanilla and beat well. Coffee may be used in place of water.

Better Meals for Less Money, by Mary Green (Year 1909)