Recipe: Coconut Corn Starch Custard

The flavor of coconut in CUSTARD is agreeable, but the toughness of this ingredient with a soft CUSTARD is not always acceptable. In the preparation of the CUSTARD given in the accompanying recipe, the idea is to obtain the flavor without the use of the coconut in the CUSTARD.

COCONUT-CORN-STARCH CUSTARD
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 pt. milk
  •  2 Tb. corn starch
  •  1/2 c. coconut
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  1/8 tsp. salt
  •  1 egg
  •  Vanilla

Heat the milk in a double boiler, retaining enough of it to moisten the corn starch. Put the coconut into the milk while it is hot, and allow it to remain for 5 or 10 minutes after the milk has become heated. Then strain through a ricer or a strainer to remove all the liquid possible, and return the milk to the double boiler. Mix the sugar and salt with the corn starch and moisten with the cold milk. Add this to the hot milk and cook for 20 or 30 minutes after it has thickened. Beat the egg and add a little of the hot material to it; then pour it into the double boiler and cook for a minute or two, or until the egg has thickened. Flavor with a few drops of vanilla, remove from the fire, cool, and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Corn Starch Custard

A dessert that is a little heavier than either French CREAM or Floating Island but not heavy enough to be molded is the corn-starch CUSTARD given in the accompanying recipe. If desired, it may be served with Sauce, plain CREAM, or whipped CREAM, or it may be eaten without any of these.

CORN-STARCH CUSTARD
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 pt. milk
  •  2 Tb. corn starch
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  1/4 tsp. salt
  •  1 egg
  •  1/2 tsp. vanilla

Heat the milk in a double boiler, reserving enough to moisten the corn starch. Mix the corn starch, sugar, and salt, and moisten with the cold milk. Add this to the hot milk, and stir until the mixture has thickened. Cook for 20 or 30 minutes. Beat the egg, add a spoonful of the hot mixture to the egg, pour this into the double boiler, and cook for a minute or two, or until the egg has thickened. Remove from the fire, add the vanilla, cool, and serve.

Recipe: Floating Island Custard

The dessert known as Floating Island does not differ very much from soft CUSTARD. It is slightly thicker and contains whipped CREAM, which is used for the island. If whipped CREAM cannot be obtained, however, the white of egg may be substituted for it. In such an event, the white of the egg included in the recipe may be retained when the CUSTARD is made and used on top by sweetening it with sugar or perhaps by beating into it a small amount of pink jelly.

FLOATING ISLAND
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 pt. milk
  •  1-1/2 Tb. corn starch
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  1/4 tsp. salt
  •  1 egg
  •  1/2 tsp. vanilla
  •  Whipped CREAM

Heat the milk in a double boiler, retaining enough to moisten the corn starch. Mix the corn starch, sugar, and salt, and moisten with the cold milk. Add this to the heated milk in the double boiler, stir until the mixture has thickened, and then cook for 20 to 30 minutes. Beat the egg, add to it a spoonful of the hot mixture, and then pour this into the double boiler, stirring to prevent the curding of the egg. Cook for a minute or two, or until the egg has had time to thicken, remove from the heat, and add the vanilla. When cold, serve in individual dishes or glasses with a spoonful of whipped CREAM on top of each portion.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: French Cream Custard

A CUSTARD dessert that is easily made and that most persons are fond of is French CREAM. As will be noted in the accompanying recipe, only one egg is used and corn starch is supplied for the remainder of the thickening. It is always necessary to salt mixtures Containing starch, as any starchy food has a raw taste when it is prepared without salt.

FRENCH CREAM
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 pt. milk
  •  1 Tb. corn starch
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  1/4 tsp. salt
  •  1 egg
  •  1/4 tsp. vanilla
  •  1/4 tsp. lemon extract

Heat the milk in a double boiler, reserving a sufficient amount to moisten the corn starch. Mix the corn starch with the sugar and salt, moisten with the cold milk, and add to the milk in the double boiler when it has heated. Stir until the mixture has thickened very slightly. Cook in the double boiler for 20 or 30 minutes. Beat the egg, add a small amount of the hot mixture to the beaten egg, and then pour this into the thickened milk, stirring rapidly to keep the egg from curding. Cook for a minute or two, remove from the fire, add the flavoring, cool, and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Soft Custard

The CUSTARD given in the accompanying recipe is commonly known as boiled CUSTARD, but this is in no sense a correct name, for the CUSTARD at no time reaches the boiling point. The common method of preparation is dry steaming, for which the double boiler is an essential utensil. If one is not in supply, however, a Saucepan placed in a larger pan of water will serve the purpose. The CUSTARD should be stirred continuously during its cooking. Then it will not set nor thicken as does baked CUSTARD, even though the proportion of eggs and milk may be higher.
[Illustration: FIG. 2, Testing doneness of soft CUSTARD with spoon.]
The test for soft CUSTARD, which is exactly opposite from that for baked CUSTARD, is shown in Fig. 2. As soon as the CUSTARD mixture lightly coats a spoon it is done. Then it should be removed from the fire and the inner part of the double boiler removed from the outer part to avoid the application of any more heat. If too much heat has been applied or the CUSTARD has been cooked too long, the result will be a curdled mass. As soon as this is observed, the CUSTARD should be removed from the hot water, placed at once into a pan of cold water, and beaten vigorously with a rotary egg beater. To improve it further, it may be poured through a fine wire sieve or strainer. Unless the curding has gone too far or the egg has been cooked a great deal too long, this treatment will produce a very decided improvement in the CUSTARD and possibly bring it to a normal condition.

SOFT CUSTARD
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 pt. milk
  •  3 eggs
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  1/4 tsp. salt
  •  1/4 tsp. vanilla
  •  1/4 tsp. lemon extract

Heat the milk in the inner pan of a double boiler. Separate the eggs. Beat the yolks slightly, and to them add the sugar and salt. Dilute with a little of the hot milk. Blend well together and pour into the hot milk. Stir constantly until the mixture coats a spoon, and then remove from the fire. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff but not dry, and fold them into the mixture. Flavor with the vanilla and lemon extract, cool, and serve.
To obtain variety in soft CUSTARDs, chocolate, caramel, maple, and other flavors may be used in their preparation in the same way as for baked CUSTARDs.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Caramel Custard

Caramel is nothing more nor less than browned sugar, but if the process of caramelizing the sugar is performed carefully, the result will be a delicious flavoring material that may be used for desserts of any kind or for making Sauces to serve with desserts. When the sugar is browned to make caramel, a certain amount of sweetness is lost, so that more sugar must be used than would ordinarily be needed to sweeten the same amount of CUSTARD.
To make the caramel required in the accompanying recipe, place 1/2 cupful of sugar in a small Saucepan over the fire. Allow the sugar to melt slowly, stirring it as little as possible. When it has completely melted and no more of it remains white, add 1/2 cupful of boiling water. Allow this to cook until a heavy sirup is formed. Care must be taken not to burn the sugar black, for if this is done, the CUSTARD, or whatever is flavored with the caramel, will have a burnt taste. The color should be a clear reddish-brown. Maple sirup may be used in the same way as caramel by cooking it until it becomes thick.

CARAMEL CUSTARD
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  2-1/2 c. milk
  •  Caramel
  •  3 eggs
  •  Pinch of salt
  •  Few drops of vanilla

Heat the milk in a double boiler, add the caramel to the milk, and then cool the mixture. Beat the eggs and add them to the caramel and milk. Add the salt and vanilla. Pour the CUSTARD into buttered baking dishes, set in a pan of warm water, and bake in a moderate oven until firm. Cool and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Baked Custard

Practically no skill is required in the preparation of baked CUSTARD, but care must be taken during the baking in order that the right temperature be applied for the proper length of time. CUSTARD of this kind is quickly made and finds favor with most persons. It may be baked in individual baking dishes and then served in these or it may be cooked in a large baking dish and served either before or after it is placed on the table. Individual baking dishes are perhaps more satisfactory, for, as there is a smaller amount of material, the heat can penetrate more quickly and evenly to the center. Whatever kind of dish is used, however, should be placed in a pan of warm water, so that the CUSTARD will bake evenly. The water in the pan should not boil, as this tends to make the CUSTARD whey, or separate.

Several tests can be applied to CUSTARD to determine whether it is sufficiently baked. As the heat penetrates to the center last, this part is the last to cook and it is therefore the place where the testing should be done. One test consists in touching the center with the tip of the finger to find out whether it is firm or not. A more common test, however, is shown in Fig. 1. To perform this test, the blade of a silver knife is inserted in the center, as illustrated. If the blade comes out clean, it may be known that the CUSTARD is sufficiently baked, but if the mixture sticks to the knife, the CUSTARD requires more baking. Before the knife blade is inserted, however, the skin that covers the CUSTARD must be broken; if this is not done, the skin is sure to cling to the knife.
24. The chief requirement of a successful CUSTARD is that its texture be right, and the temperature at which the baking is done is largely responsible for this point. Too high a temperature or too long cooking will cause the CUSTARD to curdle and leave the edges full of holes. A smoother texture may be obtained if egg yolks alone instead of the yolks and whites are used to thicken the CUSTARD. The proportions given in the accompanying recipe make a CUSTARD of very good texture, but if a greater proportion of eggs is used, the result will be a firmer, harder CUSTARD.

BAKED CUSTARD
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  2 eggs
  •  2 Tb. sugar
  •  Pinch of salt
  •  2 c. milk
  •  1/2 tsp. vanilla

Beat the eggs slightly, add the sugar and salt, and continue beating while adding the milk. Add the vanilla. Pour into a buttered baking dish or individual baking dishes, place in a moderately hot oven in a pan of warm water, and bake until the CUSTARD is set, testing with the finger or a silver knife. Remove from the heat, cool at once, and serve cold.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)