Recipe: Ham Sandwiches

Cut some thin slices of bread very neatly, having slightly buttered them; and, if you choose, spread on a very little mustard. Have ready some very thin slices of cold boiled HAM, and lay one between two slices of bread. You may either roll them up, or lay them flat on the plates. They are used at supper, or at luncheon.

You may substitute for the HAM, cold smoked TONGUE, shred or grated.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Imitate Westphalia Ham

The very finest PORK must be used for these HAMs. Mix together an equal quantity of powdered saltpetre and brown sugar, and rub it well into the HAMs. Next day make a pickle in sufficient quantity to cover them very well. The proportions of the ingredients are a pound and a half of fine salt, half a pound of brown sugar, an ounce of black pepper and an ounce of cloves pounded to powder, a small bit of sal prunella, and a quart of stale strong beer or porter. Boil them all together, so as to make a pickle that will bear up an egg. Pour it boiling hot over the meat, and let it lie in the pickle two weeks, turning it two or three times every day, and basting or washing it with the liquid. Then take out the HAMs, rub them with bran and smoke them for a fortnight. When done, keep them in a barrel of wood ashes.

In cooking these HAMs simmer them slowly for seven or eight hours.
To imitate the shape of the real Westphalia HAMs, cut some of the meat off the under side of the thick part, so as to give them a flat appearance. Do this before you begin to cure them, first loosening the skin and afterwards sewing it on again.

The ashes in which you keep them must be changed frequently, wiping the HAMs when you take them out.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Salt Pork

As the cut used for salt PORK is almost entirely fat, this piece is seldom used alone for the table. Occasionally, it is broiled to be served with some special food, such as fried apples, but for the most part it is used for larding; that is, slices of it are laid across the surface of meat and FISH that are lacking in fat and that therefore cook better and have a more agreeable flavor when fat in some form is added. PORK of this kind is usually bought by the pound and then sliced by the housewife as it is needed for cooking purposes.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3
Volume 3: Soup; Meat; Poultry and Game; Fish and Shell Fish (Year 1928)

Recipe: Pork Chops and Fried Apples

Season the chops with salt and pepper and a little powdered sage; dip them into bread crumbs. Fry about twenty minutes or until they are done. Put them on a hot dish; pour off part of the gravy into another pan to make a gravy to serve with them, if you choose. Then fry apples which you have sliced about two-thirds of an inch thick, cutting them around the apple so that the core is in the centre of each piece; then cut out the core. When they are browned on one side and partly cooked, turn them carefully with a Pancake turner, and finish cooking; dish around the chops or on a separate dish.

Directions The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Pork and Beans

Allow two pounds of pickled PORK to two quarts of dried beans. If the meat is very salt put it in soak over night. Put the beans into a pot with cold water, and let them hang all night over the embers of the fire, or set them in the chimney corner, that they may warm as well as soak. Early in the morning rinse them through a cullender. Score the rind of the PORK, (which should not be a very fat piece,) and put the meat into a clean pot with the beans, which must be seasoned with pepper. Let them boil slowly together for about two hours, and carefully remove all the scum and fat that rises to the top. Then take them out; lay the PORK in a tin pan, and cover the meat with the beans, adding a very little water. Put it into an oven, and bake it four hours.

This is a homely dish, but is by many persons much liked. It is customary to bring it to table in the pan in which it is baked.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Pickled Pork and Pease Pudding

Soak the PORK all night in cold water, and wash and scrape it clean. Put it on early in the day, as it will take a long time to boil, and must boil slowly. Skim it frequently. Boil in a separate pot greens or cabbage to eat with it; also parsnips and potatoes.
Pease PUDDING is a frequent accompaniment to pickled PORK, and is very generally liked. To make a small PUDDING, you must have ready a quart of dried split pease, which have been soaked all night in cold water. Tie them in a cloth, (leaving room for them to swell,) and boil them slowly till they are tender. Drain them, and rub them through a cullender or a sieve into a deep dish; season them with pepper and salt, and mix with them an ounce of butter, and two beaten eggs. Beat all well together till thoroughly mixed. Dip a clean cloth in hot water, sprinkle it with flour, and put the PUDDING into it. Tie it up very tightly, leaving a small space between the mixture and the tying, (as the PUDDING will still swell a little,) and boil it an hour longer. Send it to table and eat it with the PORK.

You may make a pease PUDDING in a plain and less delicate way, by simply seasoning the pease with pepper and salt, (having first soaked them well,) tying them in a cloth, and putting them to boil in the same pot with the PORK, taking care to make the string very tight, so that the water may not get in. When all is done, and you turn out the PUDDING, cut it into thick slices and lay it round the PORK.

Pickled PORK is frequently accompanied by dried beans and hominy.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Boil Corned Pork

Take a nice piece of fresh PORK, (the leg is the best,) rub it with salt, and let it lie in the salt two days. Boil it slowly in plenty of water, skimming it well. When the meat is about half done, you may put into the same pot a fine cabbage, washed clean and quartered. The PORK and the cabbage should be thoroughly done, and tender throughout. Send them to table in separate dishes, having drained and squeezed all the water out of the cabbage. Take off the skin of the PORK, and touch the outside at intervals with spots of cayenne pepper. Eat mustard with it.

PORK is never boiled unless corned or salted.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)