Recipe: Maids of Honor

Take one cupful of sour milk, one of sweet milk, a tablespoonful of melted butter, the yolks of four eggs, juice and rind of one lemon and a small cupful of white pounded sugar. Put both kinds of milk together in a vessel, which is set in another and let it become sufficiently heated to set the curd, then strain off the milk, rub the curd through a strainer, add butter to the curd, the sugar, well-beaten eggs and lemon. Line the little pans with the richest of puff paste and fill with the mixture; bake until firm in the centre, from ten to fifteen minutes.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Chocolate Tarts

Four eggs, whites and yolks, one-half cake of Baker’s chocolate, grated, one tablespoonful of cornstarch, dissolved in water, three [Pg 342]tablespoonfuls of milk, four of white sugar, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, one saltspoonful of salt, one-half teaspoonful of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of butter, melted; rub the chocolate smooth in the milk and heat to boiling over the fire, then stir in the cornstarch. Stir five minutes until well thickened, remove from the fire and pour into a bowl. Beat all the yolks and the whites of two eggs well with the sugar, and when the chocolate mixture is almost cold, put all together with the flavoring and stir until light. Bake in open shells of pastry. When done, cover with a MERINGUE made of the whites of two eggs and two tablespoonfuls of sugar flavored with a teaspoonful of lemon juice. Eat cold.

These are nice for tea, baked in patty-pans.

Common Sense in the Household.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Cocoanut Tarts

Take three cocoanuts, the meats grated, the yolks of five eggs, half a cupful of white sugar, season, a Wine-glass of milk; put the butter in cold and bake in a nice puff paste.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Cream Strawberry Tarts

After picking over the berries carefully, arrange them in layers in a deep PIE-tin lined with puff paste, sprinkling sugar thickly between each layer: fill the PIE-tin pretty full, pouring in a quantity of the juice: cover with a thick crust, with a slit in the top and bake. When the PIE is baked, pour into the slit in the top of the PIE the following cream mixture: Take a small cupful of the cream from the top of the morning’s milk, heat it until it comes to a boil, then stir into it the whites of two eggs beaten light, also a tablespoonful of white sugar and a teaspoonful of cornstarch wet in cold milk. Boil all together a few moments until quite smooth; set it aside and when cool pour it into the PIE through the slit in the crust. Serve it cold with powdered sugar sifted over it.

Raspberry, blackberry and whortleberry may be made the same.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Berry Tarts

Line small PIE-tins with PIE crust and bake. Just before ready to use fill the tarts with strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, or whatever berries are in season. Sprinkle over each tart a little sugar; after adding berries add also to each tart a tablespoonful of sweet cream. They form a delicious addition to the breakfast table.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Chocolate Tarts

6 oz. of Allinson fine wheatmeal, 2 oz. of butter, 2 oz. of Allinson chocolate (grated), 1 dessertspoonful of sugar, 1/2 oz. of ground rice, 4 eggs, well beaten, and 1 pint of milk. Mix the milk with the ground rice, add to it the chocolate smoothly and gradually; stir the mixture over the fire until it thickens, let cool a little and stir in the eggs; make the meal and butter into a paste with a little cold water; line a greased plate with it, and pour the cooled CUSTARD into it; bake the tart 1/2 hour in a moderate oven.

The Allinson Vegetarian Cookery Book, by Thomas R. Allinson (Year 1915)

Recipe: Lemon Tartlets, No. 2

Mix well together the juice and grated rind of two lemons, two cupfuls of sugar, two eggs and the crumbs of sponge cake; beat it all together until smooth; put into twelve patty-pans lined with puff paste and bake until the crust is done.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)