Recipe: Rum Omelet

Put a small quantity of lard into the pan; let it simmer a few minutes and remove it; wipe the pan dry with a towel, and put in a little fresh lard in which the OMELET may be fried. Care should be taken that the lard does not burn, which would spoil the color of the OMELET. Break three EGGS separately; put them into a bowl and whisk them thoroughly with a fork. The longer they are beaten, the lighter will the OMELET be. Beat up a teaspoonful of milk with the EGGS and continue to beat until the last moment before pouring into the pan, which should be over a hot fire.

As soon as the OMELET sets, remove the pan from the hottest part of the fire. Slip a knife under it to prevent sticking to the pan. When the centre is almost firm, slant the pan, work the OMELET in shape to fold easily find neatly, and when slightly browned, hold a platter against the edge of the pan and deftly turn it out on to the hot dish. Dust a liberal quantity of powdered sugar over it, and singe the sugar into neat stripes with a hot iron rod, heated in the coals; pour a glass of warm Jamaica rum around it, and when it is placed on the table set fire to the rum. With a tablespoon dash the burning rum over the OMELET, put out the fire and serve. Salt mixed with the EGGS prevents them from rising, and when it is so used the OMELET will look flabby, yet without salt it will taste insipid.

Add a little salt to it just before folding it and turning out on the dish.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)