Recipe: Formula for Making Gallons of Breakfast Cocoa

  •  ½ a pound of Walter Baker & Co.’s Cocoa,
  •  1 ½ gallons of water, hot,
  •  1 ½ gallons of milk, hot.

This should not be allowed to boil. Either make it in a large double-boiler, or a large Saucepan or kettle over water. Mix the cocoa with enough cold water to make a paste, and be sure it is free from lumps. Heat together the milk and water, and pour in the cocoa; then cook at least an hour, stirring occasionally.

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made
Candy Recipes, by Miss Parloa (Year 1909)

Recipe: Cocoa

  • 4 teaspoons cocoa 2 cups boiling water
  • 2 tablespoons sugar 2 cups hot milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Mix cocoa, sugar, salt, and boiling water, and boil five minutes; add hot milk, and beat with egg beater until frothy.

Better Meals for Less Money, by Mary Green (Year 1909)

Recipe: Left-Over Cocoa and Chocolate

As the materials used in the preparation of cocoa and chocolate are rather expensive, not the slightest quantity of these beverages that remains after serving should be wasted. However, a small amount of chocolate usually has to be added so that it will have a stronger flavor. It may then be thickened with corn starch for chocolate blanc mange or with gelatine for chocolate jelly. Either of these served with whipped cream or a Sauce of some kind makes an excellent dessert. Chocolate bread PUDDING may also be flavored with these left-over beverages.

It is also a good plan to utilize left-over cocoa or chocolate for flavoring purposes. However, additional cocoa or chocolate and sugar should first be added to it, and the mixture should then be boiled to a sirup. When so prepared it may be used whenever a chocolate flavoring is desired, such as for flavoring other beverages, cake icings, CUSTARDs, Sauces for desserts, and ice creams.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Iced Cocoa or Chocolate

An excellent warm-weather beverage consists of cold cocoa or cold chocolate served either with or without sweetened whipped cream. Prepare the cocoa or chocolate according to any of the recipes already given and then allow it to cool. Fill glasses with cracked ice, pour the cocoa or chocolate over it, and serve either with or without sweetened whipped cream.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Hot Chocolate

Very good hot chocolate can be made by following the directions here given. As will be noted, this recipe is similar to several of those given for cocoa, except that chocolate is substituted for the cocoa. It may therefore be used on any occasion when cocoa would be served. It is especially delicious when served with a tablespoonful or two of whipped cream.

HOT CHOCOLATE

  •  2 c. milk
  •  1-1/2 sq. unsweetened chocolate
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  Few grains of salt
  •  2 c. boiling water

Scald the milk. Melt the chocolate over the fire, add the sugar and salt, and gradually stir in the boiling water. Place over the fire, let boil for 2 or 3 minutes, and add the scalded milk. Mill and serve plain or with whipped cream.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Creamy Cocoa

When there is not very much milk on hand and still a rich, creamy cocoa is desired, the accompanying recipe should be tried. As will be noted, flour is used in addition to the usual ingredients. While this is accountable for the creamy consistency of the cocoa, it should be remembered that the cocoa must be cooked long enough to remove the raw, starchy flavor of the flour.

CREAMY COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  4 Tb. cocoa
  •  1 Tb. flour
  •  4 Tb. sugar
  •  Few grains of salt
  •  2 c. boiling water
  •  2 c. milk

Mix the cocoa, flour, sugar, and salt, and stir into a paste with some of the water. Add the rest of the water, cook for 5 minutes, and then add the milk, which has been scalded. Mill and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Rich Cocoa

There are times when it is desired to serve rich cocoa, as, for instance, with a lunch that is not high in food value or with wafers at afternoon social affairs. The accompanying recipe explains how to make cocoa that will be suitable for such occasions.

RICH COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  4 c. milk
  •  3 Tb. cocoa
  •  1/4 c. sugar
  •  Few grains of salt
  •  1/2 c. boiling water

Scald the milk. Stir the cocoa, sugar, and salt into a smooth paste with the boiling water and boil for 2 or 3 minutes. Add the scalded milk, mill, and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)