Recipe: Corn and Tomatoes

A somewhat unusual vegetable combination is made by cooking tomatoes and green corn together.

Prepare the desired number of tomatoes in the usual way for stewing and cut an equal amount of sweet corn from the cob. Put the two vegetables together in a Saucepan and cook until the tomatoes are well stewed. Season with salt, pepper, and sugar, if desired, and add a small piece of butter. Serve hot.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Corn Oysters

Variety can be secured in the use of corn by making corn Oysters. These get their name from the fact that they resemble Oysters in both size and shape. They may be served as a garnish for a meat dish or as a vegetable dish.

CORN OYSTERS
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  1 c. corn pulp
  •  1 egg
  •  1/4 c. flour
  •  1/2 tsp. salt
  •  Dash of pepper
  •  1/2 tsp. baking powder

Prepare the corn pulp according to the directions given in Art. 118. To this add the beaten egg, flour, salt, pepper, and baking powder. Drop in tablespoonfuls on a well-greased griddle. When brown on one side, turn and brown on the other side. Then fold through the center, doubling one side over the other.

Serve hot. Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Salted Corn

Remove the husk from the corn, leaving just a single layer against the corn: fold back this single layer of husk and remove all the silk, wiping with a dry cloth. Place two inches of salt in the bottom of a deep crock and stand the ears so that each one will be entirely alone and encased in salt. Stand the tip end down, pack closely with salt and place two-inch layer on top Cover and place in a cool place. It is most important that the ears do not touch.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Corn Fritters for Two People

Score and scrape the corn from two medium-sized ears, and then place in a bowl and add

  • One well-beaten egg,
  • Two tablespoons of finely minced parsley,
  • Three-quarters cup of flour,
  • One teaspoon of baking powder,
  • One half teaspoon of salt,
  • One-quarter teaspoon of pepper.

Beat to thoroughly mix and then either fry in hot fat or bake on a griddle.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Baked Dried Corn

Soak one and one-half cups of corn over night and then in the morning drain and place in a Saucepan and cover with boiling water. Simmer slowly until tender and then drain and season with

  • One small onion, minced fine,
  • Two tablespoons of dried parsley,
  • One teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half teaspoon of white pepper.

Place in a casserole dish and cover with one and a half cups of cream Sauce. Sprinkle with fine bread crumbs and one tablespoon of finely grated cheese. Bake for twenty minutes in the oven. This dish replaces meat for luncheon.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Corn Souffle

No more delightful corn dish can be prepared than corn soufflé, for in addition to its being appetizing and nutritious, it is extremely dainty. It may be cooked in a baking dish, but it is more attractive when baked in individual baking dishes. A point to remember about its preparation is that it should be served immediately upon being taken from the oven, for soufflé always shrinks as it cools.

CORN SOUFFLÉ
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  2 c. green corn pulp
  •  1 tsp. salt
  •  Dash of pepper
  •  2 Tb. melted butter
  •  2 Tb. flour
  •  1/4 c. milk
  •  2 eggs

Mix the corn pulp, salt, pepper, and melted butter, stir in the flour, and add the milk. Separate the eggs, beat the yolks, and add them to the mixture. Then beat the whites stiff and fold them in. Pour into a buttered baking dish or into individual baking dishes, set in a pan of hot water, and bake until brown. Serve at once.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Indian Corn

Corn for boiling should be full grown but young and tender. When the grains become yellow it is too old. Strip it of the outside leaves and the silk, but let the inner leaves remain, as they will keep in the sweetness. Put it into a large pot with plenty of water, and boil it rather fast for three hours or more. When done, drain off the water, and remove the leaves.

You may either lay the ears on a large flat dish and send them to table whole, or broken in half; or you may cut all the com off the cob, and serve it up in a deep dish, mixed with butter, pepper and salt.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)