Genealogy: Photographing slides and film

Photographing slides and films and filmBy Barry J. Ewell

For over 40 years I have used the camera to capture the lives of my family and friends.  The camera has been a very important tool in my professional career in public relations and advertising.  I first started with a film camera and spent hundreds of wonderful/fun hours in a dark room developing and printing my on prints.

Since the late 90’s I have used the digital camera extensively in to aid in my genealogical research in places such as local courthouses, libraries, genealogical societies, family cemeteries, and long-ago home sites and the homes of those who have a portion of the family record.

The following is the process I use with my digital camera to photograph slides and film. Continue reading

Genealogy: The digital advantage versus film advantage

The digital advantage versus film advantageBy Barry J. Ewell

As I have sought to learn about my ancestors, I’ve been fortunate to travel to some of the areas where my ancestors lived. I have had the opportunity to do on-site research at local courthouses, libraries, genealogical societies, family cemeteries, and long-ago home sites—as well as meet new “cousins.”
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Genealogy: Print scans vs. film scans

Genealogy: Print scans vs. film scansBy Barry J. Ewell

You’re probably wondering if it’s better to digitize your prints or your slides and negatives. Scanning film, slides or negatives will almost always produce better digital images than scanning prints. Slides and negatives are the original. Prints are second generation copies of the original film and do not contain as much information or detail as the negative they were made from.

If you have the option of scanning a negative, instead of scanning a print made from the negative, scan the negative. However, if this is not the case, scanning your prints is a great alternative. Continue reading