Recipe: Roast Goose

Specific directions for roasting goose are not given, because the methods differ in no way from those already given for roasting DUCK. Very young goose, or green goose, is usually roasted without being stuffed, just as young DUCK. Older goose, however, is stuffed, trussed, and roasted just as old DUCK. A very old goose may be placed in a roasting pan and steamed until it is partly tender before roasting. Apples in some form or other are commonly served with goose. For example, rings of fried apple may be used as a garnish, or apple Sauce or stewed or baked apples may be served as an accompaniment. Make gravy if desired.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3
Volume 3: Soup; Meat; Poultry and Game; Fish and Shell Fish (Year 1928)

Recipe: A Christmas Goose Pie

These pies are always made with a standing crust. Put into a Sauce-pan one pound of butter cut up, and a pint and a half of water; stir it while it is melting, and let it come to a boil. Then skim off whatever milk or impurity may rise to the top. Have ready four pounds of flour sifted into a pan. Make a hole in the middle of it, and pour in the melted butter while hot. Mix it with a spoon to a stiff paste, (adding the beaten yolks of three or four eggs,) and then knead it very well with your hands, on the paste-board, keeping it dredged with flour till it ceases to be sticky. Then set it away to cool.

Split a large goose, and a fowl down the back, loosen the flesh all over with a sharp knife, and take out all the bones. Parboil a smoked TONGUE; peel it and cut off the root. Mix together a powdered nutmeg, a quarter of an ounce of powdered mace, a tea-spoonful of pepper, and a tea-spoonful of salt, and season with them the fowl and the goose.

Roll out the paste near an inch thick, and divide it into three pieces. Cut out two of them of an oval form for the top and bottom; and the other into a long straight piece for the sides or walls of the pie. Brush the paste all over with beaten white of egg, and set on the bottom the piece that is to form the wall, pinching the edges together, and cementing them with white of egg. The bottom piece must be large enough to turn up a little round the lower edge of the wall piece, to which it must be firmly joined all round. When you have the crust properly fixed, so as to be baked standing alone without a dish, put in first the goose, then the fowl, and then the TONGUE. Fill up what space is left with pieces of the flesh of PIGEONS, or of Partridges, quails, or any game that is convenient. There must be no bones in the pie. You may add also some bits of HAM, or some force-meat balls. Lastly, cover the other ingredients with half a pound of butter, and pat on the top crust, which, of course, must be also of an oval form to correspond with the bottom. The lid must be placed not quite on the top edge of the wall, but an inch and a half below it. Close it very well, and ornament the sides and top with festoons and leaves cut out of paste. Notch the edges handsomely, and put a paste flower in the centre. Glaze the whole with beaten yolk of egg, and bind the pie all round with a double fold of white paper. Set it in a regular oven, and bake it four hours.

This is one way of making the celebrated goose pies that it is customary in England to send as presents at Christmas. They are eaten at luncheon, and if the weather is cold, and they are kept carefully covered up from the air, they will be good for two or three weeks; the standing crust assisting to preserve them.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Roast Goose

Having drawn and singed the goose, wipe out the inside with a cloth, and sprinkle in some pepper and salt. Make a stuffing of four good sized onions minced fine, and half their quantity of green sage leaves minced also, a large tea-cupful of grated bread-crumbs, a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and the beaten yolks of two eggs, with a little pepper and salt. Mix the whole together, and incorporate them well. Put the stuffing into the goose, and press it in hard; but do not entirely fill up the cavity, as the mixture will swell in cooking. Tie the goose securely round with a greased or wetted string; and paper the breast to prevent it from scorching. Fasten the goose on the spit at both ends. The fire must be brisk and well kept up. It will require from two hours to two and a half to roast . Baste it at first with a little salt and water, and then with its own gravy. Take off the paper when the goose is about half done, and dredge it with a little flour towards the last. Having parboiled the liver and heart, chop them and put them into the gravy, which must be skimmed well and thickened with a little browned flour.

Send apple-Sauce to table with the goose; also mashed potatoes.
A goose may be stuffed entirely with potatoes, boiled and mashed with milk, butter, pepper and salt.

You may make a gravy of the giblets, that is the neck, pinions, liver, heart and gizzard, stewed in a little water, thickened with butter rolled in flour, and seasoned with pepper and salt. Add a glass of red wine. Before you send it to table, take out all but the liver and heart; mince them and leave them in the gravy. This gravy is by many preferred to that which comes from the goose in roasting. It is well to have both.

If a goose is old it is useless to cook it, as when hard and tough it cannot be eaten.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Goose à la Royale

Having boned the goose, stuff it with the following forcemeat:—Twelve sage leaves, two onions, and two apples, all shred very fine. Mix with four ounces grated bread, four ounces of BEEF suet, two glasses of port wine, a grate of nutmeg, pepper, and salt to taste, the grated peel of a lemon, and the beaten yolks of four eggs; sew up the goose and fry in butter till a light brown, and put it into two quarts of good stock and let it stew for two hours, and till the liquor is nearly consumed; then take up the goose, strain the liquor and take off the fat, add a spoonful of lemon pickle, the same of browning and port wine, a teaspoonful of essence of anchovy, a little cayenne and salt, boil it up and pour over the goose.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Roast Goose Stuffed with Chestnuts

Prepare a goose and stuff it with a mixture of minced bacon, the liver, salt, pepper, grated nutmeg, and chestnuts, which have been previously cooked and peeled. Baste the goose well whilst roasting. When cooked, serve with its own gravy, and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and the juice of a lemon.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Vienna Baked Goose Breast

Take the breast of the goose and cut the meat from the bone; chop fine with some onion, 1 clove of garlic, parsley and a little thyme, salt, black pepper and paprica. Mix with 2 EGGS and fine bread-crumbs. Put the chopped breast mixture back on the bone. Place in a baking-dish; pour over some dripping; sprinkle with flour and bake until brown. Serve with sour apple compote.

Dishes & Beverages of the Old South, by Martha McCulloch Williams (Year 1913)

Recipe: Jewish Goose Greeben

Cut all the fat from the goose into small pieces and cook in a skillet with 1 cup of cold water. Let cook uncovered until the water has evaporated; then fry until brown. Sprinkle with salt and serve hot.

Dishes & Beverages of the Old South, by Martha McCulloch Williams (Year 1913)