Recipe: Bake Slice of Ham

Have the butcher cut the HAM in one-inch thick slices. Trim and then cut around the edges every two inches apart to prevent curling. Place on a baking dish and pour over the HAM

  • One cup of water
  • Two tablespoons of syrup

Bake in slow oven 25 minutes.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: To Cure Hams and Bacon (A Prize Recipe)

For each hundred pounds of HAMs, make a pickle of ten pounds of salt, two pounds of brown sugar, two ounces of saltpetre, one ounce of red pepper, and from four to four and a half gallons of water, or just enough to cover the HAMs, after being packed in a water-tight vessel, or enough salt to make a brine to float a fresh egg high enough, that is to say, out of water. First rub the HAMs with common salt and lay them into a tub. Take the above ingredients, put them into a vessel over the fire, and heat it hot, stirring it frequently; remove all the scum, allow it to boil ten minutes, let it cool and pour over the meat. After laying in this brine five or six weeks, take out, drain and wipe, and smoke from two to three weeks. Small pieces of bacon may remain in this pickle two weeks, which would be sufficient.

Directions The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Ham Sandwiches

Cut some thin slices of bread very neatly, having slightly buttered them; and, if you choose, spread on a very little mustard. Have ready some very thin slices of cold boiled HAM, and lay one between two slices of bread. You may either roll them up, or lay them flat on the plates. They are used at supper, or at luncheon.

You may substitute for the HAM, cold smoked TONGUE, shred or grated.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Imitate Westphalia Ham

The very finest PORK must be used for these HAMs. Mix together an equal quantity of powdered saltpetre and brown sugar, and rub it well into the HAMs. Next day make a pickle in sufficient quantity to cover them very well. The proportions of the ingredients are a pound and a half of fine salt, half a pound of brown sugar, an ounce of black pepper and an ounce of cloves pounded to powder, a small bit of sal prunella, and a quart of stale strong beer or porter. Boil them all together, so as to make a pickle that will bear up an egg. Pour it boiling hot over the meat, and let it lie in the pickle two weeks, turning it two or three times every day, and basting or washing it with the liquid. Then take out the HAMs, rub them with bran and smoke them for a fortnight. When done, keep them in a barrel of wood ashes.

In cooking these HAMs simmer them slowly for seven or eight hours.
To imitate the shape of the real Westphalia HAMs, cut some of the meat off the under side of the thick part, so as to give them a flat appearance. Do this before you begin to cure them, first loosening the skin and afterwards sewing it on again.

The ashes in which you keep them must be changed frequently, wiping the HAMs when you take them out.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Glaze a Cold Ham

With a brush or quill feather go all over the HAM with beaten yolk of egg. Then cover it thickly with pounded cracker, made as fine as flour, or with grated crumbs of stale bread. Lastly go over it with thick cream. Put it to brown in the oven of a stove, or brown it on the spit of a tin Roaster, set before the fire and turned frequently.
This glazing will be found delicious.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Directions for Curing Ham or Bacon

HAM or bacon, however well cured, will never be good unless the PORK of which it is made has been properly fed. The hogs should be well fattened on corn, and fed with it about eight weeks, allowing ten bushels to each hog. They are best for curing when from two to four years old, and should not weigh more than one hundred and fifty or one hundred and sixty pounds. The first four weeks they may be fed on mush, or on Indian meal moistened with water; the remaining four on corn unground; giving them always as much as they will eat. Soap-suds may be given to them three or four times a week; or oftener if convenient.

When killed and cut up, begin immediately to salt them. Rub the outside of each HAM with a tea-spoonful of powdered saltpetre, and the inside with a tea-spoonful of cayenne pepper. Having mixed together brown sugar and fine salt, in the proportion of a pound and a half of brown sugar to a quart of salt, rub the PORK well with it. This quantity of sugar and salt will be sufficient for fifty pounds of meat. Have ready some large tubs, the bottoms sprinkled with salt, and lay the meat in the tubs with the skin downward. Put plenty of salt between each layer of meat. After it has lain eight days, take it out and wipe off all the salt, and wash the tubs. Make a pickle of soft water, equal quantities of salt and molasses, and a little saltpetre; allowing four ounces of saltpetre to two quarts of molasses and two quarts of salt, which is the proportion for fifty pounds of meat. The pickle must be strong enough to bear up an egg. Boil and skim it; and when it is cold, pour it over the meat, which must be turned every day and basted with the pickle. The HAMs should remain in the pickle at least four weeks; the shoulders and middlings of the bacon three weeks; and the jowls two weeks. They should then be taken out and smoked. Having washed off the pickle, before you smoke the meat, bury it, while wet, in a tub of bran. This will form a crust over it, and prevent evaporation of the juices. Let the smoke-house be ready to receive the meat immediately. Take it out of the tub after it has lain half an hour, and rub the bran evenly over it. Then hang it up to smoke with the small end downwards. The smoke-house should be dark and cool, and should stand alone, for the heat occasioned by an adjoining–building may spoil the meat, or produce insects. Keep up a good smoke all day, but have no blaze. Hickory is the best wood for a smoke-house fire, In three or four weeks the meat will be sufficiently smoked, and fit for use. During the process it should be occasionally taken down, examined, and hung up again. The best way of keeping HAMs is to wrap them in paper, or, to sew them in coarse cloths (which should be white-washed) and bury them in a barrel of hickory ashes. The ashes must be frequently changed.

An old HAM will require longer to soak, and longer to boil than a new one.

Tonques may be cured in the above manner.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Boiled Ham

Cut the HAM into very thin slices, (the thinner the better.) Soak them in hot water at least half an hour, (a whole hour is better,) to draw out some of the salt; changing the water several times, and always pouring it on scalding hot. This process will not only extract the superfluous salt (which would otherwise ooze out in broiling and remain sticking about the surface of the meat) but it makes the HAM more tender and mellow. After soaking, dry the slices in a cloth, and then heat your gridiron, and broil them over a clear fire.

If you have cold boiled HAM, it is better for broiling than that which is raw; and being boiled, will require no soaking before you put it on the gridiron.

If you wish to serve up eggs with the HAM, put some lard into a very clean frying-pan, and make it boiling hot. Break the eggs separately into a Saucer, that in case a bad one should be among them it may not mix with the rest. Slip each egg gently into the frying-pan. Do not turn them while they are frying, but keep pouring some of the hot lard over them with an iron spoon; this will do them sufficiently on the upper side. They will be done enough in about three minutes; the white must retain its transparency so that the yolk will be seen through it. When done, take them up with a tin slice, drain off the lard, and if any part of the white is discoloured or ragged, trim it off. Lay a fried egg upon each slice of the broiled HAM, and send them to table hot.
This is a much nicer way than the common practice of frying the HAM or bacon with the eggs. Some persons broil or fry the HAM without eggs, and send it to table cut into little slips or mouthfuls.

To curl small pieces of HAM for garnishing, slice as thin as possible some that has been boiled or parboiled. The pieces should be about two inches square. Roll it up round little wooden skewers, and put it into a cheese toaster, or into a tin oven, and set it before the fire for eight or ten minutes. When it is done, slip out the skewers.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)