Recipe: Egg Lemonade

Place the yolk of an egg in a small bowl and add

  • Three tablespoons of pulverized sugar,
  • Two tablespoons of lemon juice,
  • One-half cup of ice-cold water.

Beat to mix and then pour into tall thin glasses and add stiffly beaten white of egg, folding in carefully. Add four tablespoons of crushed ice and fill the glass with carbonated water. Orange juice may be used in place of the lemon juice.

Year 1918

Recipe: Pineapple Lemonade

Another variation of lemonade is produced when pineapple juice is added to it. To garnish this beverage, a slice of lemon and a spoonful of grated pineapple are generally used. This pineapple beverage is delightful with wafers or small cakes as refreshments for informal social affairs during hot weather.

Pineapple Lemonade (Sufficient to Serve Six)

  • 1 c. water
  • 3/4 c. sugar
  • 3 c. ice water
  • 1 c. juice from canned pineapple
  • 3 lemons

Make a sirup of the water and sugar, and set aside to cool. Add the ice water, the pineapple juice, and the juice of the lemons. Stir well, strain, and serve. Garnish with a slice of lemon and a spoonful of grated pineapple added to each glass.

Year 1928

Recipe: Ice Lemonade

May be made in the above manner, but with a larger proportion of sugar.
The juice of pine-apples, strawberries, raspberries, currants and cherries, may be prepared and frozen according to the above receipts. They will freeze in a shorter time than if mixed with CREAM, but are very inferior in richness.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Lemonade

Next to water, no other drink is so refreshing nor quenches the thirst to so great an extent as lemonade. Lemonade is suitable for many occasions, and as lemons can be purchased at any time of the year it can be made at almost any season. The lemon sirup prepared for this beverage may be used as desired, for if it is put in a cool place it will keep for a long time. The more the sirup is boiled down, the better will it keep. A tablespoonful or two of glucose or corn sirup added to such mixtures when they are boiled will help to keep them from crystallizing when they stand.

LEMONADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  • 1 c. sugar
  • 1 qt. water
  • 1/2 c. lemon juice

Make a sirup by boiling the sugar and water for a few minutes, and set aside to cool. Add the lemon juice and then dilute with ice water to suit the taste. Serve in glasses and garnish each one with a slice of lemon or a red cherry.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Lemonade

Take fine ripe lemons, and roll them under your hand on the table to increase the quantity of juice. Then cut and squeeze them into a pitcher, and mix the juice with loaf-sugar and cold water. To half a pint of lemon juice you may allow a pint and a half of water; and ten or twelve moderate sized lumps of sugar. Send it round in little glasses with handles.

To make a tumbler of very good lemonade, allow the juice of one lemon and four or five lumps of sugar, filling up the glass with water. In summer use ice water.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Mint Lemonade

  • 1 cup sugar 1 cup mint leaves
  • 6 cups water Juice of 3 lemons

Boil sugar and water twenty minutes; add mint, and let stand until cold; add lemon juice, and strain into glasses half filled with cracked ice. Garnish with sprigs of mint.

Better Meals for Less Money, by Mary Green (Year 1909)

Recipe: Grape Lemonade

An excellent combination in the way of a beverage is lemonade and grape juice. Besides adding flavor to the lemonade, the grape juice gives it a delightful color.

GRAPE LEMONADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  • 1 qt. lemonade
  • 1 c. grape juice

Add the grape juice to the lemonade and stir well. Serve ice cold in glasses.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)