Recipe: Braised Leg of Mutton

This recipe can be varied either by preparing the leg with a stuffing, placed in the cavity after having the bone removed, or cooking it without. Having lined the bottom of a thick iron kettle or stewpan with a few thin slices of bacon, put over the bacon four carrots, three onions, a bunch of savory herbs; then over these place the leg of MUTTON. Cover the whole with a few more slices of bacon, then pour over half a pint of water. Cover with a tight cover and stew very gently for four hours, basting the leg occasionally with its own liquor, and seasoning it with salt and pepper as soon as it begins to be tender. When cooked strain the gravy, thicken with a spoonful of flour (it should be quite brown), pour some of it over the meat and send the remainder to the table in a tureen, to be served with the MUTTON when carved. Garnish the dish around the leg with potatoes cut in the shape of olives and fried a light brown in butter.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Leg of Mutton ala Venson

Remove all the rough fat from the MUTTON and lay it in a deep earthen dish; rub into it thoroughly the following: One tablespoonful of salt, one each of celery-salt, brown sugar, black pepper, English mustard, allspice, and some sweet herbs, all powdered and mixed; after which pour over it slowly a teacup of good vinegar, cover tightly, and set in a cool place four or five days, turning it and basting often with the liquid each day. To cook, put in a kettle a quart of boiling water, place over it an inverted shallow pan, and on it lay the meat just as removed from the pickle; cover the kettle tightly and stew for four hours. Do not lat the water touch the meat. Add a cup of hot water to the pickle remaining and baste with it. When done, thicken the liquid with flour and strain through a fine sieve, to serve with the meat; also a relish of currant jelly, the dame as for VENISON.
This is a fine dish when the directions are faithfully followed.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Mutton Rechauffée

Prepare and boil one quart of potatoes, (cost three cents;) slice the best part of the mutton remaining from the day before, saving all the scraps and trimmings, dip each slice in a beaten egg, or a little milk, (cost one cent,) roll it in bread crumbs, dried and sifted and fry them in sweet drippings. Serve the meat and potatoes together; they will cost about fifteen cents.

Twenty-Five Cent Dinners for Families of Six, by Juliet Corson (Year 1879)

Recipe: Mutton Kromeskys

Cut cold mutton in half inch dice; chop one ounce of onion, and fry it pale yellow in one ounce of sweet drippings, (cost one cent;) add one ounce of flour, and stir until smooth; add half[Pg 59] a pint of water, two tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley, one level teaspoonful of salt, one level saltspoonful of white pepper, half a saltspoonful of powdered herbs, as much cayenne as can be taken up on the point of a very small penknife blade, and the chopped meat; the seasonings will cost about one cent; stir until scalding hot, add the yolk of one raw egg, (cost one cent,) cook for two minutes, stirring frequently; and turn out to cool on a flat dish, slightly oiled, or buttered, to prevent sticking, spreading the minced meat about an inch thick; set away to cool while the batter is being made.

Twenty-Five Cent Dinners for Families of Six, by Juliet Corson (Year 1879)

Recipe: Mutton Chops

Take chops or steaks from a loin of MUTTON, cut off the bone close to the meat, and trim off the skin, and part of the fat. Beat them to make them tender, and season them with pepper and salt. Make your gridiron hot over a bed of clear bright coals; rub the bars with suet, and lay on the chops. Turn them frequently; and if the fat that falls from them causes a blaze and smoke, remove the gridiron for a moment till it is over. When they are thoroughly done, put them into a warm dish and butter them. Keep them covered till a moment before they are to be eaten.

When the chops have been turned for the last time, you may strew over them some finely minced onion moistened with boiling water, and seasoned with pepper.
Some like them flavoured with mushroom catchup.

Another way of Dressing MUTTON chops is, after trimming them nicely and seasoning them with pepper and salt, to lay them for awhile in melted butter. When they have imbibed a sufficient quantity, take them out, and cover them all over with grated bread-crumbs. Broil them over a clear fire, and see that the bread does not burn.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Boil Mutton

To prepare a leg of MUTTON for boiling, wash it clean, cut a small piece off the shank bone, and trim the knuckle. Put it into a pot with water enough to cover it, and boil it gently for three hours, skimming it well. Then take it from the fire, and keeping the pot well covered, let it finish by remaining in the steam for ten or fifteen minutes. Serve it up with a Sauce-boat of melted butter into which a tea-cup full of capers or nasturtians have been stirred.

Have mashed turnips to eat with it.

A few small onions boiled in the water with the MUTTON are thought by some to improve the flavour of the meat. It is much better when sufficient time is allowed to boil or simmer it slowly.

A neck or a loin of MUTTON will require also about three hours slow boiling. These pieces should on no account be sent to table the least under-done. Serve up with them carrots and whole turnips. You may add a dish of suet dumplings to eat with the meat, made of finely chopped suet mixed with double its quantity of flour, and a little cold water.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: To Roast Mutton

MUTTON should be roasted with a quick brisk fire. Every part should be trimmed off that cannot be eaten. Wash the meat well. The skin should be taken off and skewered on again before the meat is put on the spit; this will make it more juicy. Otherwise tie paper over the fat, having soaked the twine in water to prevent the string from burning. Put a little salt and water into the dripping-pan, to baste the meat at first, then use its own gravy for that purpose. A quarter of an hour before you think it will be done, take off the skin or paper, dredge the meat very lightly with flour, and baste it with butter. Skim the gravy and send it to table in a boat. A leg of MUTTON will require from two hours ROASTing to two hours and a half in proportion to its size. A chine or saddle, from two hours and a half, to three hours. A shoulder, from an hour and a half, to two hours. A loin, from an hour and three quarters, to two hours. A haunch (that is a leg with, part of the loin) cannot be well roasted in less than four hours.

Always have some currant jelly on the table to eat with ROAST MUTTON. It should also be accompanied by mashed turnips.

Slices cut from a cold leg of MUTTON that has been under-done, are very nice broiled or warmed on a gridiron, and sent to the breakfast table covered with currant jelly.
Pickles are always eaten with MUTTON.

In preparing a leg of MUTTON for ROASTing, you may make deep incisions in it, and stuff them with chopped Oysters, or with a force-meat made in the usual manner; or with chestnuts parboiled and peeled. The gravy will be improved by stirring into it a glass of port wine.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)