Recipe: Boiled Parsnips

Wash, scrape and split them. Put them into a pot of boiling water; add a little salt, and boil them till quite tender, which will be in from two to three hours, according to their size. Dry them in a cloth when done and pour melted butter or white Sauce over them in the dish. Serve them up with any sort of boiled meat or with salt cod.

Parsnips are very good baked or stewed with meat.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Creamed Parsnips

Parsnips are sometimes cut into dice and then served with a cream, Sauce. When it is desired to prepare them in this way, the accompanying directions should be carefully followed.

CREAMED PARSNIPS
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  2 c. diced parsnips
  •  2 Tb. butter
  •  2 Tb. flour
  •  1/2 tsp. salt
  •  Dash of pepper
  •  1 c. milk

Clean and scrape the parsnips and cut them into dice 1/2 inch in size. Put these to cook in sufficient boiling salted water to cover, cook until they may be easily Pierced with a fork, and then drain. Melt the butter in a double boiler, and add the flour, salt, and pepper. Stir in the hot milk, and cook until the mixture thickens. Pour this Sauce over the parsnips, heat together for a few minutes, and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Stewed Parsnips

After washing and scraping the parsnips slice them about half of an inch thick. Put them in a Saucepan of boiling water Containing just enough to barely cook them; add a tablespoonful of butter, season with salt and pepper, then cover closely. Stew them until the water has cooked away, watching carefully and stirring often to prevent burning, until they are soft. When they are done they will be of a creamy light straw color and deliciously sweet, retaining all the goodness of the vegetable.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Fried Parsnips

Boil tender in a little hot water salted; scrape, cut into long slices, dredge with flour; fry in hot lard or dripping, or in butter and lard mixed; fry quite brown. Drain off fat and serve.

Parsnips may be boiled and mashed the same as POTATOES.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Browned Parsnips

Parsnips that are browned and sweetened with sugar seem to meet with greater favor than those prepared by other methods. To prepare them in this way, clean and scrape the desired number of parsnips, and slice them in thick slices, or, if they are small, cut them in halves lengthwise. Put them to cook in boiling salted water and cook until they may be easily Pierced with a fork, but are not tender enough to fall to Pieces. Melt some fat in a frying pan, and place the slices of cooked parsnips in it. Brown on one side, turn, and then brown on the other. Sprinkle with a little sugar and, if necessary, additional salt. Serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Mashed Parsnips

A very simple way in which to prepare parsnips is to mash them. Clean and scrape the desired number of parsnips and put them to cook in sufficient boiling salted water to cover. Cook until tender enough to be Pierced with a fork, the length of time required to do this depending entirely on the age of the parsnips. When tender, drain off the water and force the parsnips through a colander or a sieve. Season with butter, salt, and pepper, and serve hot.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)