Recipe: Roast Partridges, Pheasants, Quail or Grouse

Carefully cut out all the shot, wash thoroughly but quickly, using soda in the water; rinse again, and dry with a clean cloth. Stuff them and sew them up. Skewer the legs and wings to the body, larder the breast with very thin slices of fat salt PORK, place them in the oven, and baste with butter and water before taking up, having seasoned them with salt and pepper; or you can leave out the PORK and use only butter, or cook them without stuffing. Make a gravy of the drippings thickened with browned flour. Boil up and serve in a boat.

These are all very fine broiled, first splitting down the back, placing on the gridiron the inside down, cover with a baking tin, and broil slowly at first. Serve with cream gravy.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Partridge à la Vénitienne

Put a brace of Partridges into a stewpan with butter, two glasses of Chablis, and two glasses of stock, add a bouquet garni, very little garlic, two cloves, salt and pepper; let them simmer gently. Take them off when done, pass the gravy through a sieve, add a little butter and flour to thicken it, a small piece of glaze, a little cayenne and salt. Pour the Sauce over the Partridges, and cover over all with two spoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese; put a few breadcrumbs and pieces of clarified butter on this, and set the whole on a baking sheet in the oven. Brown the birds well, and serve with Sauce espagnole or Sauce piquante.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Partridges à la Sierra Morena

Take a brace of Partridges properly trussed; cut into dice one inch thick a little less than half a pound of bacon, and put them in the stewpan; cut two large onions in quarters, take six whole black peppers, a little salt, one bayleaf, half a gill of vinegar, one gill of port wine, one gill of water, one tablespoonful of SALAD oil, and put all these ingredients into the stewpan; put on the lid, and cover the stewpan with half a sheet of brown kitchen paper; put the stewpan on a slow fire to stew for two hours; then take out the Partridges and dish them and put round some of the quarters of onions which have been stewed. Pass the gravy through a sieve and send to table.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Scalloped Partridges

Take the fillets of a brace of Partridges, sauté them in butter till firm, drain them, and put in some good game stock and two tablespoonfuls of Allemagne Sauce; when boiling put in the scalloped Partridges, with two or three peeled mushrooms, a small piece of butter, and the juice of half a lemon. Dish up the scallops in a circle, and fill the same in the centre.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Partridges à la Reine

Truss a brace of Partridges for boiling, fill them with good game forcemeat, with two or three truffles cut up in small pieces, and tie thin slices of fat bacon over them. Slice a small carrot into a stewpan with an onion, four or five sticks of celery, two or three sprigs of parsley, and an ounce of fresh butter. Place the Partridges on these, breasts uppermost, pour over them half a pint of good stock, cover with a round of buttered paper, and simmer as gently as possible till the Partridges are done enough. Strain the stock, free it carefully from grease, thicken it with a little flour and as much browning as is necessary; flavour with a little cayenne, half a dozen drops of essence of anchovy, and a tablespoonful of sherry. Stir this Sauce over a gentle fire till it is on the point of boiling, then pour it over the Partridges already dished up on toast, and serve instantly.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Partridge Pudding

Take a brace of well-kept Partridges, cut them into neat joints and skin them; line a quart PUDDING basin with suet crust, place a thinnish slice of rump steak at the bottom of the dish cut into pieces, put in the pieces of partridge, season with pepper and salt, and pour in about a pint of good dark stock well clarified from fat, then put on the cover and boil in the usual way.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Partridge Pie

Cut the breasts and legs off two or three birds, sprinkle them with pepper and salt, and cook them in the oven smothered in butter, and covered with a buttered paper. Pound the carcases, and make them into good gravy, but do not thicken it.

Take the livers of the birds with an equal quantity of calf’s liver, mince both, and toss them in butter over the fire for a minute or two; then pound them in a mortar with an equal quantity of bacon, two shalots parboiled, with pepper, salt, powdered spice, and sweet herbs to taste. When well pounded, pass it through a sieve; put a layer of forcemeat into a pie-dish, arrange the pieces of partridge on it, filling up the interstices with the forcemeat; then pour in as much gravy as is required, put on the paste cover, and bake for an hour. When done, a little more boiling hot gravy may be introduced through the hole in the centre of the crust. A little melted aspic jelly may be added to the gravy.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)