Recipe: Pheasant à la Tregothran

Bone a Pheasant and stuff it with the meat from four woodcocks or six snipe, cut it up, and chop up some truffles and make it into forcemeat. Fry the trail of the woodcock or snipe in a little butter, and place on little rounds of fried bread and arrange round the dish. Stew the bones of the woodcocks or snipe to make the gravy, reduce it, and add a glass of Marsala to the BROTH and serve in a boat.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant à la Suisse

Take the remains of a cold Pheasant, cut it into neat joints. Salt and pepper these highly, and strew over it finely chopped onion and parsley. Cover them with oil, and squeeze over them the juice of a lemon. Turn the pieces every now and then, and let them remain till they have imbibed the flavour, then dip the pieces in a batter made of four ounces of flour, with as much milk added as will make a thick batter. Stir into it half a wineglassful of brandy and an egg, the white and yolk beaten to a froth. This batter should rest for an hour in a warm place before using. Fry the pieces of CHICKEN in the batter, and send it up piled on a dish garnished with fried parsley.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant en Surprise

Take a Pheasant, remove the skin from the breast and take away all the meat, removing any gristle there may be, and place it in a mortar. Have ready half a pint of good cream, and begin by pouring half the quantity over the Pheasant and pound together for a few minutes, then rub it through a clean wire sieve. When passed, put it back into the mortar, add the remainder of the cream gradually into the fowl, stirring it round so that they blend together perfectly. Fill a mould with this mixture and twist a bit of buttered paper round the top; then fold a sheet of paper several times and place it in a stewpan, put about half a pint of boiling water into the stewpan, or more according to size of it, and let all simmer gently for twenty minutes. Add a little salt and a dust of cayenne pepper. Turn this out and mix with it half a pint of white aspic jelly. Have ready some very clear aspic jelly, and colour it red. Take a pretty shaped jelly mould, pour in a little of the red aspic to about rather more than a quarter of the mould. When this is cool, put in the Pheasant and aspic mixture, and place on ice for four hours; when properly frozen, turn out, and garnish the top with a wreath of fresh chervil leaves. Serve chopped aspic in little mounds round the base alternately with mounds of mayonnaise SALAD or tomatoes.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant des Rois

Have a pound of the best preserved truffles, such as can be obtained at Benoist’s, in Wardour Street, stew them in a mixture of a quarter of a pound of butter, a large tablespoonful of finest Lucca oil, and half a pound of bacon fat scraped into shreds. Thoroughly cook the truffles, so that a silver fork can be stuck into them without pushing hard. Stuff a Pheasant with them and sew it up. Cover the breast with a slice of fat bacon, and put two or three slices beneath it. Place round the Pheasant pieces of VEAL and HAM cut into small cubes the size of dice, add a few carrots, an onion or two, salt and pepper. Pour on it a claretglassful of Chablis, cover the Saucepan, place it on a slow fire and use the salamander, then let it stew for an hour. When ready to serve, strain the same, removing all grease, and pour over the bird.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant Stewed with Cabbage

Truss a Pheasant for boiling. Divide a large cabbage into quarters, soak them after cutting off the stalks, plunge them into boiling water and boil for about ten minutes. Take them out, drain them and press all the water from them, then put them into the stewpan. Lay the Pheasant well in the cabbage, add six ounces of good bacon, half a pound of Bologna PIGEONS, three PORK PIGEONSs, some parsley, a bayleaf, a bouquet garni, one carrot, an onion stuck with four cloves, a shalot, and some pepper. Pour in as much stock as will cover the whole, and cover the pan closely and bring to a boil and let it simmer slowly for an hour. Then take out the bird and the meat and keep them warm whilst the cabbage is drained, peppered, and salted, and steamed over fire till dry. Then place it on a dish, arrange the Pheasant on it and all the other adjuncts round it. Serve poivrade Sauce in a tureen.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant Pie with Oysters

Boil a Pheasant till almost done; it will finish cooking in the pie. Make as much gravy as the size of the bird will require, add half a cup of milk, season and thicken it. Make a good pie-crust, and then put the pieces of Pheasant in a pie-dish, which must be hot. Scatter some raw Oysters among the pieces of Pheasant, pour over all enough gravy to fill the dish to the depth of one inch, and cover it with the crust, which must be pressed against the edge so that it will adhere. Let it bake for half an hour. After it is cooked, pour in remainder of the gravy in the slit in the top of the crust.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)

Recipe: Pheasant and MACARONI

Pull the flesh with two forks from a cold roast Pheasant. Put the bones and trimmings into a Saucepan with enough water to cover them, and let them simmer till it is much reduced. Add two shalots, a little salt and pepper, a grate of nutmeg, a gill of mushroom ketchup and the same of Marsala. Thicken with flour and butter, and let all simmer gently for twenty minutes; strain it, and put it back into the Saucepan for it to boil up. Just before the Pheasant is to be served, put the meat into the gravy and let it warm through without boiling. After it is dished, place round it some MACARONI made as follows:—Have two pints of boiling water, into which plunge four ounces of MACARONI, add pepper and salt, and simmer gently for twenty minutes. Drain it, and put it into a pint of good stock, with a little salt, a teaspoonful of unmixed mustard and a dust of cayenne. Let it all boil till the MACARONI is tender, then add a tablespoonful of Parmesan cheese and an ounce of butter. Toss it over fire till all is well mixed, then serve.

Dressed Game and Poultry à la Mode, by
Harriet A. de Salis (Year1888)