Recipe: Winter Salad

A SALAD made entirely of winter vegetables may be prepared when there are no fresh vegetables in supply. If any of the vegetables are left over, the others may be prepared to use with the left-over ones. A good plan to follow when carrots, turnips, or potatoes are being prepared for a meal is to cook more than is necessary for the one meal and then set aside part of them for a SALAD to be served at another meal.

WINTER SALAD
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  1 c. turnips, diced
  •  1 c. carrots, diced
  •  1 c. potatoes, diced
  •  1 Tb. chopped onion
  •  French Dressing
  •  Lettuce
  •  SALAD Dressing

Cook turnips, carrots, and potatoes whole in boiling water until tender enough to be pierced with a fork. If they have not been peeled before cooking, peel and cut into small dice. Mix, add the onion, marinate with French Dressing, and allow to stand for a short time. Garnish SALAD plates with lettuce leaves, pile the SALAD on the lettuce, and serve with any desired SALAD Dressing.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Cabbage Salad

A SALAD that always finds favor is made by combining cabbage with a boiled SALAD Dressing or with an uncooked sour-CREAM Dressing. SALAD of this kind may be served in any desired way, but a rather novel way to serve it is illustrated in Fig. 2. The contents of a head of cabbage is removed, leaving four or five of the outside leaves intact. The shell thus formed is cut into points around the top and then filled with shredded cabbage and the Dressing that is to be used. When this is placed on a bed of lettuce, an attractive dish is the result.

To make cabbage SALAD, select a firm head of cabbage, pull off the outside leaves, and wash. Cut the head in half down through the heart and root and cut each half into quarters. Then, as shown in Fig. 3, place each quarter on a cutting board and with a sharp knife shave off the cabbage. If desired, however, the cabbage may be shredded with a cabbage cutter. If the cabbage, upon being cut, is found to be wilted, place it in cold water and let it stand until it becomes crisp.

Drain off the water carefully and allow the cabbage to drip in a colander or dry it between pieces of old linen. With the cabbage thus prepared, season it with salt and mix it with the desired Dressing. Serve on lettuce in a SALAD dish, on individual SALAD plates.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Cucumber and Tomato Salad

A SALAD made of cucumbers and tomatoes is very attractive because of the contrasting colors of the vegetables, and it is at the same time extremely palatable. When such a SALAD is to be made, small, firm tomatoes and rather large cucumbers that do not contain very large seeds should be selected. Peel the cucumbers and tomatoes and cut them into slices of any desired thickness. Garnish SALAD plates with lettuce, and on this place a ring of the slices, alternating the tomatoes with the cucumbers. In the center, put a slice of cucumber or tomato and serve with any desired SALAD Dressing.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Onion Salad

o persons who are fond of the flavor of onions, the SALAD given in the accompanying recipe is very agreeable, but it is a wise plan not to serve onions or SALADs Containing onions unless every one who is served is certain to enjoy them. When a SALAD is made from onions, a mild onion, such as the Bermuda or Spanish onion, should be selected.

ONION SALAD
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  3 onions
  •  French Dressing
  •  Parsley
  •  Lettuce

Peel the onions and slice them into thin slices. Chop the parsley and add it to 1 or 2 tablespoonfuls of French Dressing. Use comparatively coarse leaves of lettuce and shred them. Arrange the slices of onion on a bed of the shredded lettuce, pour the French Dressing with the parsley over all, and serve.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Peas and Celery Salad

Peas may be freshly cooked for peas-and-celery SALAD, but canned peas will do just as well. Left-over peas not prepared with CREAM Sauce may also be utilized nicely in this way, or if a portion of a can of peas is needed for the meal, the remainder may be used for a smaller quantity of SALAD than here stated. Boiled SALAD Dressing will be found to be best for this combination of vegetables.
PEAS-AND-CELERY SALAD
(Sufficient to Serve Four)

  •  1 c. peas
  •  Boiled SALAD Dressing
  •  1 c. diced celery
  •  Lettuce

Drain canned peas as dry as possible and mix with the diced celery. Just before serving, add the SALAD Dressing and mix thoroughly. Serve on SALAD plates garnished with lettuce.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Tomato Salad

Fresh tomatoes make a delightful SALAD because of their appetizing appearance and color. In fact, when they are placed on a bed of green garnish, nothing can be more delightful. Tomatoes may be served whole on a lettuce leaf or they may be sliced. They may be cut from the center into sections that are allowed to fall part way open. In any of these forms, they may be served with French Dressing, mayonnaise, or any cooked SALAD Dressing.

STUFFED-TOMATO SALAD.–An attractive SALAD in which vegetables of almost any kind, fresh or canned, may be used to advantage is the stuffed-tomato SALAD shown in Fig. 7. Medium-sized, well-ripened tomatoes are best to select. The vegetables that may be used for the STUFFING are celery, radishes, onions, cucumbers, cooked asparagus, green peas, and string beans. Any one or any desirable combination of these vegetables will make a satisfactory filling.

STUFFED-TOMATO SALAD
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  6 medium-sized tomatoes
  •  French Dressing
  •  1 1/2 c. diced vegetables
  •  Mayonnaise Dressing

Cut out the stem and blossom ends of the tomatoes and hollow out the center so as to leave a shell. Dice the contents of the tomatoes and mix with the other diced vegetables. Marinate the diced vegetables with French Dressing and put into the tomato shells, heaping each one as shown. Place on lettuce leaves and serve with mayonnaise.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Combination Salad

A combination SALAD may be made of almost any combination of vegetables. The one given here contains only fresh vegetables, but, if desired, others may be added or some of those mentioned may be omitted. This will be found to be a very attractive way in which to make a large SALAD to be served from a bowl or a deep plate.

COMBINATION SALAD

  •  Lettuce
  •  Radishes cut in rose shape
  •  Sliced tomatoes
  •  Celery
  •  Sliced onions
  •  SALAD Dressing
  •  Sliced peppers

Garnish a bowl or a plate with lettuce, arrange on it slices of tomato, Spanish or Bermuda onions, and peppers. Garnish these with radishes cut into rose shape and stems of celery cut in any desired way. Be sure that the vegetables, which should all be crisp and fresh, are thoroughly cleaned and drained before being put on the plate. Add the SALAD Dressing in the preferred way. It may be poured over the vegetables in the large dish, passed to each individual, or put on the SALAD plates by the person who serves. French Dressing is without doubt the most suitable for combination SALAD, but mayonnaise or cooked SALAD Dressing may be served with it if desired.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)