Recipe: Sauted Sauerkraut

If an entirely different way of cooking sauerkraut is desired, it may be sautéd. When nicely browned and served with boiled frankfurters, it is very appetizing.

SAUTÉD SAUERKRAUT
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  1 qt. sauerkraut
  •  4 Tb. bacon or ham fat
  •  2 tsp. salt

Steam the sauerkraut over boiling water for about 1 hour. Then melt the fat in an iron frying pan, add the sauerkraut and sprinkle with the salt. Place a cover over the pan and allow the sauerkraut to sauté until it is slightly browned on the bottom. Stir and continue to cook until the entire amount is slightly browned. Serve hot.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Baked Sauerkraut

In the cooking of sauerkraut for the table, pork in one form or another is generally added; in fact, one rarely thinks of sauerkraut except in combination with pork. While boiling is the method that is usually applied to this vegetable, many housewives prefer to bake it, for then the odor does not escape so easily and a flavor that most persons prefer is developed.

BAKED SAUERKRAUT
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  2 lb. fresh pork
  •  1 qt. sauerkraut
  •  1 Tb. salt
  •  3 c. water

Cut the pork into several large chunks, and put it with the sauerkraut into a baking dish that has a cover. Add the salt and water, cover the dish and place in the oven. Bake slowly for 2 or 3 hours. Serve hot.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Sauerkraut with Spareribs

Persons who are fond of sauerkraut find the combination of sauerkraut and spareribs very appetizing. The spareribs give the cabbage a very pleasing flavor and at the same time supply nourishment to the dish.

SAUERKRAUT WITH SPARERIBS
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  •  1 qt. sauerkraut
  •  2 lb. spareribs
  •  1 tsp. salt
  •  3 c. water

Put the sauerkraut and the spareribs into a kettle and add the salt and water. Allow to simmer slowly for 2 or more hours. If additional water is necessary, add it from time to time. Just before removing from the heat, allow the water to boil down so that what remains may be served with the hot sauerkraut.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Makeing Sauerkraut

As is well known, sauerkraut is a cabbage preparation that is made by salting finely cut cabbage, packing it tightly, and allowing it to ferment under pressure. This food is made and sold commercially, so that the housewife can usually purchase it in any quantity she desires. However, as it is not at all difficult to make sauerkraut, and as a supply of cabbage in this form provides a valuable article of food during the winter months in households where it is relished, the housewife will do well to prepare enough of this kind of cabbage to vary her meals during the winter. That she may understand how to proceed with the making of sauerkraut and the proper cooking of it, the accompanying directions and recipes are given.

For every 10 medium-sized heads of cabbage, measure 2 cupfuls of salt. Cut the heads of cabbage into quarters and shred on a cabbage slicer, or cutter. Place several inches of the shredded cabbage in the bottom of a large crock, and over it sprinkle a layer of salt. Stamp this down with a wooden potato masher or some other similar utensil. Then add another layer of cabbage and salt and stamp this down in the same way. Proceed in this manner until the crock is nearly full. Then place a clean cloth over the cabbage in the crock. On this cloth place a clean board as near the size of the crock as possible, and on the board place a large clean stone or some other weight. When thus filled and weighted down, place the crock in a cool place. The cabbage will then begin to ferment, and it is this fermentation that changes the cabbage into sauerkraut. After a time, juice will form and gradually rise over the top of the board, and on top of this juice will form a scum.

Remove this scum at once, and do not allow any to collect at any time after the fermentation of the cabbage ceases. Occasionally, when a supply of sauerkraut is taken from the crock for cooking, replace the cloth by a clean one, but always be sure to put the board and the weight back in place.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Sourcrout

Barrels having held wine or vinegar are used to prepare sourcrout in. It is better, however, to have a special barrel for the purpose. Strasburg, as well as all Alsace, has a well-acquired fame for preparing the cabbages. They slice very white and firm cabbages in fine shreds with a machine made for the purpose. At the bottom of a small barrel they place a layer of coarse salt and alternately layers of cabbage and salt, being careful to have one of salt on the top. As each layer of cabbage is added, it must be pressed down by a large and heavy pestle and fresh layers are added as soon as the juice floats on the surface. The cabbage must be seasoned with a few grains of coriander, juniper berries, etc. When the barrel is full it must be put in a dry cellar, covered with a cloth, under a plank, and on this heavy weights are placed. At the end of a few days it will begin to ferment, during which time the pickle must be drawn off and replaced by fresh, until the liquor becomes clear. This should be done every day. Renew the cloth and wash the cover, put the weights back and let stand for a month. By that time the sourcrout will be ready for use. Care must be taken to let the least possible air enter the sourcrout and to have the cover perfectly clean. Each time the barrel has to be opened it must be properly closed again. These precautions must not be neglected.

This is often fried in the same manner as fried cabbage, excepting it is first boiled until soft in just water enough to cook it, then fry and add vinegar.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Bavarian Sauerkraut

Cook 2 pounds of fresh pork; season with salt and pepper; add 2 bay-leaves and a few cloves. When half done, add 1 quart of sauerkraut and let cook one hour. Add 1 cup of wine and 1 tablespoonful of brown sugar. Let all cook until tender. Serve with potato DUMPLINGS.

Dishes & Beverages of the Old South, by Martha McCulloch Williams (Year 1913)