Recipe: Baked Winter Squash

Cut open the squash, take out the seeds and without paring cut it up into large pieces; put the pieces on tins or in a dripping-pan, place in a moderately hot oven and bake about an hour. When done, peel and mash like mashed POTATOES, or serve the pieces hot on a dish, to be eaten warm with butter like sweet POTATOES. It retains its sweetness much better baked this way than when boiled.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Winter Squash or Cashaw

This is much finer than the summer squash. It is fit to eat in August, and, in a dry warm place, can be kept well all winter. The colour is a very bright yellow. Pare it, take out the seeds, cut it in pieces, and stew it slowly till quite soft, in a very little water. Afterwards drain, squeeze, and press it well, and mash it with a very little butter, pepper and salt.

Directions for Cookery, In Its Various Branches.
Ladies and Professional Cooks.
Containing
The Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food. (Year 1840)

Recipe: Baked Winter Squash

Cut half a small squash into four pieces, scrape out seeds and stringy part, put in a pan, shell side up, and bake in a hot oven about forty minutes. Remove from shell with a spoon, press through a sieve, season with salt, pepper, and butter, and serve. Or put in a greased baking dish, cover with Buttered Crumbs, and bake until crumbs are brown.

Better Meals for Less Money, by Mary Green (Year 1909)

Recipe: Baked Squash

Cut a slice from the top of the squash and remove the seeds and the string fibre. Now add

  • One tablespoon of melted butter,
  • One-half teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half teaspoon of paprika.

Cover closely with a lid and then bake in a slow oven until the pulp is tender, usually about thirty minutes. Remove the lip and scoop out the pulp with a spoon, piling it into a hot vegetable dish, and garnish with finely chopped parsley and then serve.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Squash Pie

Wash and then cut the squash into pieces and then boil until tender and drain; rub the pulp through sieve. Measure, and to each cup add

  • One cup of sugar,
  • Two tablespoons of melted butter,
  • Two well-beaten eggs,
  • One cup of milk,
  • One-half teaspoon of nutmeg.

Beat well to mix and then pour in a pie tin which has been lined with plain pastry. Sprinkle one-half cup of currants over the top and bake for one-half hour in a slow oven.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Squash Cakes

Wash and cut the squash into pieces and then cook until tender in boiling water, then drain and rub pulp through sieve. Now measure and place in a bowl

  • One cup of prepared squash,
  • One well-beaten egg,
  • One tablespoon of shortening,
  • One-half cup of milk,
  • One and one-half cups of flour,
  • Two tablespoons of baking powder,
  • One-half teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half teaspoon of paprika,
  • One tablespoon of minced parsley.

Beat to mix and then bake as if for griddle cakes on a hot griddle. Serve with maple syrup.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Squash Au Gratin

Wash, pare and cut the squash into pieces, discarding the seeds. Steam until tender and then drain well and stand on the back of the range to dry. Now rub the pulp through a sieve. Measure and add to each cup of pulp

  • One well-beaten egg,
  • Two tablespoons of butter,
  • One teaspoon of salt,
  • One-half teaspoon of paprika,
  • Two tablespoons of milk,
  • One tablespoon of finely minced parsley.

Pour into well-greased baking dish and cover with fine bread crumbs and two tablespoons of grated cheese. Bake in a slow oven for twenty minutes.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss