Recipe: Steak Country Style

  • 1½ pounds flank steak 1/3 teaspoon salt
  • 4 onions 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon flour ¼ cup boiling water

Pound the steak with a meat pounder or a wooden potato masher to break the tough fibers. Sear quickly on each side in a very hot frying pan; peel and chop onions, dredge with flour, and put in pan with the steak; add salt and pepper; cover closely, and cook slowly an hour and a half. Put steak on platter, add boiling water to onions, and pour around steak. Serve with hashed brown potatoes.

Better Meals for Less Money, by Mary Green (Year 1909)

Recipe: Swiss Steak

Season a round steak with salt, black pepper and paprica; dredge with flour and let fry in hot lard on both sides until brown. Then add some sliced onions and moisten well with tomato-Sauce. Cover and let simmer half an hour. Serve hot on a platter with mashed potatoes.

Dishes & Beverages of the Old South, by Martha McCulloch Williams (Year 1913)

Recipe: Spanish Broiled Steak

Season a porter-house steak with salt and pepper and rub with butter. Place on a hot gridiron and let broil on a quick fire on both sides. Make this Sauce: Chop 1 onion and brown in 1 tablespoonful of butter; add 1/2 cup of stock and 1/2 cup of claret; let boil well. Season and thicken the Sauce with a little flour and some chopped parsley. Let boil up and serve at once with the steak.

Dishes & Beverages of the Old South, by Martha McCulloch Williams (Year 1913)

Recipe: Rolled Steak, or Mock Duck

To have a delicious meat, it is not always necessary to secure the tender, expensive cuts, for excellent dishes can be prepared from the cheaper pieces. For instance, steaks cut from the entire round or thin cuts from the rump can be filled with a stuffing and then rolled to make rolled steak, or mock DUCK. This is an extremely appetizing dish and affords the housewife a chance to give her family a pleasing variety in the way of meat. The steak used for this purpose should first be broiled in the way explained in Art. 43. Then it should be filled with a stuffing made as follows:

STUFFING FOR ROLLED STEAK

  • 1 qt. stale bread crumbs
  • 1 c. stewed tomatoes
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 Tb. salt
  • 2 Tb. butter
  • 1/4 Tb. pepper
  • 1 c. hot water

Mix all together. Pile on top of the broiled steak and roll the steak so that the edges lap over each other and the Dressing is completely covered. Fasten together with skewers or tie by wrapping a cord around the roll. Strips of bacon or salt PORK tied to the outside or fastened with small skewers improve the flavor of the meat. Place in a roasting pan and bake in a hot oven until the steak is thoroughly baked. This will require not less than 40 minutes. Cut into slices and serve hot.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3
Volume 3: Soup; Meat; Poultry and Game; Fish and Shell Fish (Year 1928)

Recipe: Hamburger Steak

Take a pound of raw flank or round steak, without any fat, bone or stringy pieces. Chop it until a perfect mince, it cannot be chopped too fine. Also chop a small onion quite fine and mix well with the meat. Season with salt and pepper; make into cakes as large as a BISCUIT, but quite flat, or into one large flat cake a little less than half an inch thick. Have ready a frying pan with butter and lard mixed; when boiling hot put in the steak and fry brown. Garnish with celery top around the edge of the platter and two or three slices of lemon on the top of the meat.

A brown gravy made from the grease the steak was fried in and poured over the meat enriches it.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Flank Steak

This is cut from the boneless part of the flank and is secreted between an outside and inside layer of creamy fat. There are two ways for broiling it. One is to slice diagonally across the grain; the other is to broil it whole. In either case brush butter over it and proceed as in broiling other steaks. It is considered by butchers the finest steak, which they frequently reserve for themselves.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)

Recipe: Beefsteak Pie

Cut up rump or flank steak into strips two inches long and about an inch wide. Stew them with the bone, in just enough water to cover them, until partly cooked; have half a dozen of cold boiled potatoes sliced. Line a baking-dish with pie paste, put in a layer of the meat with salt, pepper, and a little of thinly-sliced onion, then one of the sliced potatoes, with bits of butter dotted over them. Then the steak, alternated with layers of potato, until the dish is full. Add the gravy or BROTH, having first thickened it with brown flour. Cover with a top crust, making a slit in the middle; brush a little beaten egg over it, and bake until quite brown.

The Whitehouse Cookbook, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette (Year 1887)