Recipe: Lentil Tea

(A substitute for Beef Tea.)

  • 1 pint soaked lentils.
  • 1 pint water.
  • 2 ounces butter.
  • ½ teaspoon salt.
  • 2 cloves.
  • 6 peppercorns.
  • A very small piece of mace.
  • A little pepper if liked.

Dissolve the butter in a Saucepan, place in all the ingredients except salt and pepper. Boil half an hour, removing the scum as it rises. Add salt, boil another half hour. Strain carefully and serve with toast or bread.

Note.—The lentils should be re-boiled, and will make a very useful stock.

New Vegetarian Dishes, by Mrs. Bowdich (Year 1892)

Recipe: Left Over Tea

Tea that remains after all persons are served need not be wasted if it is poured off the leaves at once. Such tea is satisfactory for iced tea, or it may be combined with certain fruit juices in the preparation of various cold beverages. However, there are not many satisfactory uses for left-over tea; so it is best to take pains not to make more than will be required for one time.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Iced Tea

Perhaps one of the most refreshing drinks for warm weather is iced tea. A tea that is especially blended for this purpose and that is cheaper in price than other tea may be purchased. Slices of lemon or crushed mint leaves add much to the flavor of the tea and are often served with it.

Prepare tea by steeping it, but make it double strength. Strain it from the leaves and allow it to become cool. Then pour it into glasses Containing cracked ice. Serve with sugar and slices of lemon or mint leaves.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Afternoon Tea

When tea is desired for afternoon serving or when it is to be prepared at the table, a tea ball is the most satisfactory utensil to use. This is a perforated silver or aluminum ball, such as shown in Fig. 6, which opens by means of a hinge and into which the tea is placed. For convenience in use, a chain is attached to the ball and ends in a ring that is large enough to slip over the finger. Some teapots contain a ball attached to the inside of the lid and suspended inside the pot. Utensils of this kind are very convenient, for when the tea made in them becomes strong enough, the leaves may be removed without pouring off the tea.

To prepare afternoon tea with a tea ball, put 1 or 2 teaspoonfuls of tea in the ball, fasten it securely, and place it in a cup. Then pour enough freshly boiled water over the ball to fill the cup to the desired height. Allow the ball to remain in the water until the desired strength is attained and then remove it. If more than 2 or 3 persons are to be served, it will be necessary to refill the ball.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Steeped Tea

When tea is to be steeped, a teapot is used. That the best results may be secured, the teapot should always be freshly scalded and the water freshly boiled.

STEEPED TEA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

  • 2 Tb. tea
  • 1 qt. boiling water

Scald the teapot. Put the tea into the teapot and pour the boiling water over it. Let stand on the back of the stove for 3 minutes, when a beverage of sufficient strength will be formed. Strain the beverage from the tea leaves and serve at once.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

Recipe: Parisian Tea

Place two teaspoonfuls of tea in a pitcher and pour over it one cup of boiling water. Cover closely and let stand for one-half hour. Drain and then place in the ice box until needed.

To serve—place four tablespoons of the tea infusion in a tall glass and add

  • Juice of one-half lemon,
  • One-half cup of crushed ice,
  • Three mint leaves,
  • and fill with carbonated water.
  • Use pulverized sugar to sweeten if desired.

Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5
by Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences (Year 1928)

Recipe: Sage or Marygold Tea

Put a dozen sage leaves into a tea-pot, pour boiling water upon them, and, after allowing the tea to stand for five or ten minutes, it may be drunk with sugar and milk, in the same way and instead of the cheaper kinds of teas, which are sold for foreign teas, but which are too often composed of some kind of leaf more or less resembling the real plant, without any of its genuine fragrance, and are, from their spurious and almost poisonous nature, calculated to produce evil to all who consume them, besides the drawback of their being expensive articles.

Teas made from sage leaves, dried mint, marygolds, and more particularly the leaf of the black currant tree, form a very pleasant as well as wholesome kind of beverage; and, if used in equal proportions, would be found to answer very well as a most satisfactory substitute for bad and expensive tea.

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (Year 1918)
by C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss